I think I’m a crap photographer, lousy artist, rubbish writer... and am getting too old to ride fixie and love French women. However, I have 25 different Tumblr themes ranging from Arts and Cafés to Leicas and Volkswagens; and don’t load those pages with ordinary images but select stimulating visuals. To see all my theme updates follow "Ed Buziak / Fotoformat" on Facebook.
"Motivo con parola TAC" ~ Giacomo Bella, c.1921. Coloured paper laid down on cardboard, dia.24 cm.
blastedheath
flommus:

"Motivo con parola TAC" ~ Giacomo Bella, c.1921.
Coloured paper laid down on cardboard, dia.24 cm.

blastedheath

flommus:

(via rossfordart)

Abstract… by Willem de Kooning. I love many styles and schools of art (mostly modern) but once in a while something just hits me between the eyes… and I want to put it onto my wall. Alas…
killthecurator:

Abstract… by Willem de Kooning.
I love many styles and schools of art (mostly modern) but once in a while something just hits me between the eyes… and I want to put it onto my wall. Alas…

killthecurator:

Favorite American cities by Otto Steininger… This illustration appeared in “Travel & Leisure”.
I love the graphic illustrations by Otto… and follow him on Facebook, Tumblr and Pinterest.
ottosteininger:

Favorite American cities by Otto Steininger…
This illustration appeared in “Travel & Leisure”.

I love the graphic illustrations by Otto… and follow him on Facebook, Tumblr and Pinterest.

ottosteininger:

(Source: ottosteininger, via primarybliss)

Caran d’Ache have unveiled “Les crayons de la maison Caran d’Ache”, a series of pencils made from Titanium Oak, Macassar Ebony, Lati Gray, and American Walnut… OMG, they have to be used, despite being so precious!
For some wonderful examples and the history of pencils, visit PencilTalk.org

Caran d’Ache have unveiled “Les crayons de la maison Caran d’Ache”, a series of pencils made from Titanium Oak, Macassar Ebony, Lati Gray, and American Walnut… OMG, they have to be used, despite being so precious!

For some wonderful examples and the history of pencils, visit PencilTalk.org

"Windermere" ~ Edward Burra, 1973. Pencil and watercolour, 100.3 x 68 cm.
Edward Burra (1905-1976) was an English painter, draughtsman, and printmaker, best known for his depictions of the urban underworld, black culture and the Harlem scene of the 1930s.
Burra travelled widely, and many influences are at play in his works, which were usually watercolour on a large scale in strong colours. During World War Two, when it became impossible to travel, he also became involved in designing scenery and costumes for ballet (including Miracle in the Gorbals) and became very successful in that field.
In 2011, the BBC aired an hour-long documentary “I Never Tell Anybody Anything: The Life and Art of Edward Burra”, wherein art critic Andrew Graham-Dixon chronicles the life of Burra. The documentary follows Burra from his native town of Rye to the Paris nightlife spots he loved and the jazz clubs of prohibition-era New York and the war-torn landscapes of the Spanish Civil War and back to England during the Blitz. It shows how Burra’s increasingly disturbing and surreal work deepened and matured as he experienced at first hand some of the most tragic events of the century. Through letters and interviews with those who knew him, it presents a portrait of an English eccentric.
blastedheath:

"Windermere" ~ Edward Burra, 1973.
Pencil and watercolour, 100.3 x 68 cm.

Edward Burra (1905-1976) was an English painter, draughtsman, and printmaker, best known for his depictions of the urban underworld, black culture and the Harlem scene of the 1930s.

Burra travelled widely, and many influences are at play in his works, which were usually watercolour on a large scale in strong colours. During World War Two, when it became impossible to travel, he also became involved in designing scenery and costumes for ballet (including Miracle in the Gorbals) and became very successful in that field.

In 2011, the BBC aired an hour-long documentary “I Never Tell Anybody Anything: The Life and Art of Edward Burra”, wherein art critic Andrew Graham-Dixon chronicles the life of Burra. The documentary follows Burra from his native town of Rye to the Paris nightlife spots he loved and the jazz clubs of prohibition-era New York and the war-torn landscapes of the Spanish Civil War and back to England during the Blitz. It shows how Burra’s increasingly disturbing and surreal work deepened and matured as he experienced at first hand some of the most tragic events of the century. Through letters and interviews with those who knew him, it presents a portrait of an English eccentric.

blastedheath:

I used to have a “Bayko” set during the 1950s. Mind you… the model buildings were much smaller than this illustration shows, or we were bigger children!
Toytown: Architecture on the Carpet. The Financial Times architecture correspondent Edwin Heath reviews Architecture on the Carpet: The…
View Post
casualoptimist:

I used to have a “Bayko” set during the 1950s.
Mind you… the model buildings were much smaller than this illustration shows, or we were bigger children!

Toytown: Architecture on the Carpet.
The Financial Times architecture correspondent Edwin Heath reviews Architecture on the Carpet: The…

View Post

casualoptimist:

"From the Lake No.1" ~ Georgia O’Keeffe, 1924.
peira:
acqua-di-fiori:

"From the Lake No.1" ~ Georgia O’Keeffe, 1924.

peira:

acqua-di-fiori:

"The Eel" ~ John Tarahteeff.
Ominous clouds and skies tinted lime or translucent blue provide a backdrop to the mystery and intrigue of John Tarahteeff’s new work. Voluptuous females reference old masters, such as 17th century painter Titian. They are pictured playing occasional instruments, wading into shallow water. Tarahteeff continues to incorporate heavy texture in places to describe rocky ground, a raised line to express an unwinding ball of yarn or trees and leaves dramatically advancing out from the picture plane. The inclusion of these psychological, pictorial elements works to his advantage both intellectually and aesthetically.
John Tarahteeff’s paintings show great range, technical skill and seamless blending of intelligence and aesthetics. These new paintings have a story to tell, exposing in a spontaneous moment the whole of the tale. The work speaks in the deeply personal language of the artist.
In 1994 Tarahteeff graduated from the University of California, Davis with a B.S. in Landscape Architecture and a minor in Fine Art. The artist’s paintings were first introduced by Solomon Dubnick Gallery in 1998.
journalofanobody:

"The Eel" ~ John Tarahteeff.

Ominous clouds and skies tinted lime or translucent blue provide a backdrop to the mystery and intrigue of John Tarahteeff’s new work. Voluptuous females reference old masters, such as 17th century painter Titian. They are pictured playing occasional instruments, wading into shallow water. Tarahteeff continues to incorporate heavy texture in places to describe rocky ground, a raised line to express an unwinding ball of yarn or trees and leaves dramatically advancing out from the picture plane. The inclusion of these psychological, pictorial elements works to his advantage both intellectually and aesthetically.

John Tarahteeff’s paintings show great range, technical skill and seamless blending of intelligence and aesthetics. These new paintings have a story to tell, exposing in a spontaneous moment the whole of the tale. The work speaks in the deeply personal language of the artist.

In 1994 Tarahteeff graduated from the University of California, Davis with a B.S. in Landscape Architecture and a minor in Fine Art. The artist’s paintings were first introduced by Solomon Dubnick Gallery in 1998.

journalofanobody:

Child… by Joan Eardley.
Joan Eardley (1921-1963) is considered to be the most influential Scottish painter of her generation. Her depiction of both the rural and urban sides of Scotland is unique.
The dramatic seascapes of wild winter seas were painted out of doors on the shore or cliff top of Catterline, a small east coast fishing village south of Aberdeen. Eardley loved the ever changing light and weather of this rugged coastline and although many of these large paintings are of the same view they each capture the different mood of a bright evening sunset or a dark approaching storm.
She also portrayed the changing seasons in the fields around the village in heavily layered and textured paint even incorporating real flower heads into the surface.
In total contrast to this expression of nature she also spent periods of time in Glasgow depicting the children and tenements around her Townhead studio.
These powerful drawings and paintings capture the humanity of these poor but vibrant children. Eardley paints them as they are in secondhand clothes, eating a ‘piece’, playing in the street, the girls looking after their younger siblings. Their relationships and friendships are captured in Eardley’s unique style whether in a quick sketch or large painted composition.
Her death from cancer in 1963 at the age of only 42 robbed the world of an outstanding artist at the height of her achievement.
angrywhistler:

Child… by Joan Eardley.

Joan Eardley (1921-1963) is considered to be the most influential Scottish painter of her generation. Her depiction of both the rural and urban sides of Scotland is unique.

The dramatic seascapes of wild winter seas were painted out of doors on the shore or cliff top of Catterline, a small east coast fishing village south of Aberdeen. Eardley loved the ever changing light and weather of this rugged coastline and although many of these large paintings are of the same view they each capture the different mood of a bright evening sunset or a dark approaching storm.

She also portrayed the changing seasons in the fields around the village in heavily layered and textured paint even incorporating real flower heads into the surface.

In total contrast to this expression of nature she also spent periods of time in Glasgow depicting the children and tenements around her Townhead studio.

These powerful drawings and paintings capture the humanity of these poor but vibrant children. Eardley paints them as they are in secondhand clothes, eating a ‘piece’, playing in the street, the girls looking after their younger siblings. Their relationships and friendships are captured in Eardley’s unique style whether in a quick sketch or large painted composition.

Her death from cancer in 1963 at the age of only 42 robbed the world of an outstanding artist at the height of her achievement.

angrywhistler:

joderquebuenoes:

Sunday, por Vincent Peters

joderquebuenoes:

Sunday, por Vincent Peters

(via cafeapostrophe)

I’ve known that lonely feelin’

I’ve known that lonely feelin’

(Source: cromulentcomix, via lormiguel)

Toy train photograph by Mark Sadlier… and he must have had a lot of fun with this subject!
thesensualstarfish:

Toy train photograph by Mark Sadlier…
and he must have had a lot of fun with this subject!

thesensualstarfish:

"Box of Apples in Wales" ~ Lucian Freud, 1939.
bofransson:

"Box of Apples in Wales" ~ Lucian Freud, 1939.

bofransson:

"Métaphore" ~ René Magritte, 1923. Oil on canvas, 40 x 50.2 cm. (Belgian, 1898-1967).
nudeartbuzz:
blastedheath:

"Métaphore" ~ René Magritte, 1923.
Oil on canvas, 40 x 50.2 cm.
(Belgian, 1898-1967).

nudeartbuzz:

blastedheath:

Can’t disagree with that statement!

Can’t disagree with that statement!

(Source: jessijaejoplin, via cubiclerefugee)

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